Black Woman

What is a Black Woman?

You tell me! I’m more than just a human that bears children. I’m more than just a piece of flesh for a man’s mere muse and pleasure.

What is a black woman? Is it her curves, her hips or her juicy lips? Is it her breasts her long hair, or her being a creature of fresh air?

For years the Black Woman anatomy has been manipulated by man’s greed as we can see from centuries to centuries from myths and legends to folklore to local stories.

Women are a man’s greatest weakness.

But man’s depiction of a woman doesn’t define her. She’s more than a mere sex object. History tells us women learned to sow and stay in the kitchen, men went to war and went to work. Women fought for their rights to go to work, to go to school, is it not fair that a woman has the right to exert her human rights?

The suffragettes and feminists want women to be liberated. I’m not too sure about this ideology. Don’t call me anti-feminist, I’m a woman too just like you. ‘Women are equal to men’, that’s the statement, yes we are, we are both human. But the notion still stands women can’t do everything a man can do.

In an idyllic world a man is the protector, the breadwinner of the home. It’s not the same anymore, times have changed, with so many Black single mothers around and absentee Black fathers selling their rights to get with a woman overnight, Black women have to take up the role of mother and father. She goes to work, she raises her kids, through good times and bad times she provides their needs all by herself.

God didn’t make it this way, two heads are better than one.

Man was not created to be alone. Women are delicate. Remember our origin, God took Eve from Adams rib, you can’t straighten her with force nor can you bend her, so why do we have so many Black women who are victims of violence?

This is a virus I see through my iris, Black women are dying and Black children are crying, where is the justice? Boys will be boys so women are just their toys. This is a shame, I don’t recall God allowing this to happen like we are just a computer game. This is reality, we need to address this issue cos by the end of the poem you will be needing a tissue.

In all totality we can see the brutality, women being battered by men because of their insecurities, where does the problem lie? He wanted the piece of the pie, she said ‘he’s the guy, why would he lie? He said he loves me that’s why.’ But the fear and the guilt of you leaving him has torn a hole in your heart as he used a poison dart,  you fear he’s out to kill you, maybe that’s true, with all the messages he’s left you…

Women deserve a right to education, knowledge is power, and weak men are scared of strong women. But have you forgotten that strong Black women require a strong Black man not an insecure one. Strong women become strong mothers and strong wives that raise strong children to empower a nation, this is determination. I’m tryna reach this youth’s generation.  There will always be baby mama drama, that’s part of the karma. You lived your life once (YOLO), now take up your responsibilities and be a role model. Black Women are mothers of a nation, break her and you’ve lost your kingdom your riches your wealth and even worse – your whole generation.

– Ogechi – © 

 

Fifteen

This post is about a serious issue that a friend of mine has made a short film about, to raise awareness and bring courage to those who may be in the same situation.

“I wanted to do something different. Things like this happen all the time, but you don’t hear about it. Why? Because it’s seen as a taboo so the victims do not normally come forward to tell someone. Like the girl in this film, if a person does not feel the courage to speak out, it will only continue to happen…

I want to continue making films like this. I want to make a difference in the film making industry. It is a risk. People might react to it in a negative way. ‘Oh Alexia, you’re not allowed to show that’, but I think it needs to be shown. It has been kept in the dark for too long and it needs to come to light.”

Alexia

 

Natural Hair Show London 2016

On Saturday 7th May, myself and my two beautifully natural friends went to the 4th annual Natural Hair show in London. It really was a great day out, where we met other beautiful black women of all shades, hair types, shapes and sizes. I have to mention, that we also got some serious freebies….

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As expected, we were spoilt for choice when we saw the sea of stalls selling tonnes of natural hair care products for all hair types and styling techniques. There was also all kinds of authentic African & Caribbean inspired jewellery, clothing and art, along with other accessories, black soap, shea butter and black books for children and adults. I even saw modern looking clocks with African & Caribbean flags painted on.

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Throughout the day, there were workshops focusing on hair and skin issues, hair styling & head wrap demonstrations and children’s workshops. There was also an amazing fashion & hair presentation, catwalk style. It was great to see a range of African inspired print designs, along with some serious natural hair styles! Black is so beautiful!

I really encourage black women and men too, to check out any hair events running near you. Eventbrite is always a great platform to see what’s on. These events are useful for learning about how to maintain length and general care for our hair. Society, the media, the beauty industry and education in schools are not going to express or expose the beauty of our natural hair, so it is up to us to do it ourselves. This is about self-love and sharing it with our brothers and sisters in the black community. Let us continue to take pride in the crowns upon our heads!

Eunice

 

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Too Black for Brazil – the reality of colourism

As a follow up to my previous post, Dark skin, Light skin: two sides of the same coin, I decided to write about a video I actually came across months ago. I wanted to write about it then but I was too angry. Now, I still am but words are better than bottled anger.

This video is titled ‘too black for Brazil’. The title speaks volumes. Watch and read my response to this deep rooted issue we have, called colourism.

http://www.theguardian.com/news/video/2016/feb/09/brazilian-carnival-queen-too-black-nayara-justino-video

Nayara is a beautiful melanated black Brazilian woman. Too melanated for Brazil it seems… What I found really upsetting is the fact that she won the title of Carnival Queen, making it seem like Brazil was trying to take a step in the right direction, and away from colourism, yet as soon as the public voiced their opinions, they replaced her with another mixed race woman. What was the point of selecting her if you were not going to stand by her? People will make their racist, ignorant and hurtful comments, but this shouldn’t be a deterrent to the changes Brazil needs to work on.

How will this teach or at least make sleeping black people aware of their own sub-consciously distorted mind-sets. Black people in Brazil descend from their ancestors who were taught by the white man to hate themselves, which was then passed on from generation to generation. Keeping Nayara on wouldn’t have broken this damaging cycle overnight, but it would have created the platform for people to QUESTION themselves and their mind-sets.  Instead of supporting Nayara and standing up for her and her melanated skin, some black people chose to follow the white racist mind-set. Why? Why are so many black people not proud to be black? Who taught you to hate the colour of your skin? Ask yourself that.

During the video, a black woman says her grandmother told her mother “You should marry a white man to improve the race.”

A white man to improve the race…

As if to say the black race are completely inferior and need white blood to make it pure. I think this is a deafening example of the Willie Lynch complex where many black people in Brazil hate themselves, as a result of the generational cycle of self-hatred imposed by white European slave masters. Never mind improving the race, improving our dam mind-sets is what we need to work on!

The painting shown in the video is beyond words… The mealnated grandmother has her hands up as if to say thanks to God for removing the ‘stain’ of blackness from her family, who we see are lighter and therefore ‘closer to white’. It’s sad and crazy to think that there are black people, not just in Brazil but in other parts of the world who may actually believe they need the white race – the same race who kidnapped, enslaved, raped, tortured and psychologically destroyed their ancestors, to ‘improve’ the black race.

Seriously?

Get outta here.

The only way black people can ‘improve’ themselves is through UNITY amongst ourselves in every aspect, not this team mulatto/light skin v dark skin nonsense. How are we ‘improved’ if we’re divided? Think about it! We need to let go of the  psychological chains of slavery and learn to love every dam shade of melanin  we see.

We are a MELANIN race. Be proud, be bold and stay melanated!

 

Eunice